Kitten Hygiene: Keeping your Kitten Clean

Like many animals, kittens instinctively clean themselves regularly. But by taking additional steps needed for proper feline hygiene, you will help her stay healthier and happier.

Bathing Your Kitten

Different breeds of cats have varying levels of tolerance for water. Follow your veterinarian’s recommendations for bathing your kitten. Generally, most medium and long-haired breeds need to be bathed, so it’s important to get them used to water at an early age.

Make sure your kitten’s first bath is a pleasant and gentle experience. Constant reassurance is important:

  1. Use a warm, wet washcloth or sponge to moisten your kitten. If she reacts with hostility, give her more reassurance, and repeat until she becomes comfortable.
  2. Fill the bottom of a bathtub or sink with water that’s 96°-98° F. Gently put your kitten in the water, continuing to reassure her with words and gentle stroking.
  3. Wet her back without wetting her head and without pouring water into her eyes or ears.
  4. With a shampoo formulated especially for your kitten’s skin and hair, wash her coat, concentrating on any areas that are especially dirty.
  5. Thoroughly rinse all the shampoo from her coat and towel dry her with a warm, clean cloth.
  6. You may want to use a hair dryer to finish drying her, but first get her comfortable with the noise.
  7. Bathing your kitten will help keep her clean and will also help prevent hairballs, which can lead to digestive issues.

Caring for Your Kitten’s Claws


Kittens use their claws instinctively to mark their territory. Ask your veterinarian to cut the tips of her claws so her natural behavior will not damage your furniture. If you want to do it yourself, first ask the veterinarian to show you which part of the nails you can cut.

Clipping her claws should not be painful, and getting her used to it at an early age will make it less stressful too.

Cleaning Your Kitten’s Teeth

Tartar and plaque can build up on your kitten’s teeth, causing inflammation of her gums and bad breath. If it’s an extreme case, her teeth could fall out.

Your veterinarian will examine your kitten’s teeth during her regular visits and can show you how to properly brush her teeth daily. It’s more critical to brush her adult teeth, but like bathing, it’s easier to get her used to it while she’s a young kitten.

With proper hygiene of her hair, claws and teeth, you’ll help minimize risks for digestive issues and oral infections, while minimizing damage to your home and the relationship with your feline friend.

 

 

TIPS TO TAKE AWAY
01
Follow your veterinarian’s recommendations for bathing your kitten.
02
Bathing your kitten will help keep her clean and will also help prevent hairballs, which can lead to digestive issues.
03
Clipping her claws should not be painful, and getting her used to it at an early age will make it less stressful too